New findings reveal CurraNZ lowers blood pressure and makes exercising EASIER

New findings reveal CurraNZ lowers blood pressure and makes exercising EASIER

SCIENTISTS have found that using CurraNZ for a minimum of one week can make exercise an easier experience.   

In a new 30-minute brisk walking study in men, the University of Chichester has found two capsules of our blackcurrant extract increases cardiovascular function and lowers blood pressure during exercise.

Plus, CurraNZ became even more effective after two weeks of use.

Mark Willems, Professor of Exercise Physiology at the University of Chichester, who performed the studies, says: “It is really beneficial to have higher cardiac output during exercise because your muscles receive a greater supply of oxygen and you can better cope with fatigue. Therefore, it’s easier for the body to deal with that exercise."

In the two trials, 15 healthy male participants took 600mg (two capsules) of CurraNZ and were tested after 7 days, 14 days and every second day for 14 days. 

They performed a 30-minute moderate-intensity walking test, during which stroke volume, cardiac output, blood pressure, heart rate and total peripheral resistance were measured.

The findings, released at the Nutrition Conference in Baltimore, USA in June, showed:

  • Participants on CurraNZ experienced a 6% reduction to diastolic blood pressure after 7 days, which increased to 11% after 14 days of daily use
  • A 14% reduction in total peripheral resistance after 14 days continuous intake
  • No significant effect on mean arterial pressure (average blood pressure measurement) after a week, but reduced by 7% after 14 days
  • 9% increase to cardiac output at 7 and 14 days
  • 10% increase to stroke volume after 14 days

Professor Willems adds: “If we were to see the same effects from blackcurrant in people who have limitations in blood flow, then they could really benefit.

"Blackcurrant widens blood vessels and therefore you would probably be more comfortable with this kind of brisk walking exercise.

"On the extreme end, it would be interesting to see the effect of blackcurrant on people with peripheral arterial disease who, due to their condition, find exercise hard.”

This study comes hard on the heels of previous findings that CurraNZ favours fat as fuel and improves fat burning by 16% during 30 minutes of brisk walking in men and up to 27% during two hours of cycling in women.

Professor Willems says: "If you combine the observations, these studies contain exciting messages for the effectiveness of blackcurrant and what it offers the general public looking to improve their health and fitness.”